Canadian Nationalisms (2013)

Draft. See course Blackboard or syllabus distributed in class for official version.

UNI267H1: Canadian Nationalisms

Instructor: Dr. Benjamin Bryce

Term: Fall 2013

Time: Mondays, 10:00-12:00

Classroom: UC 161

Course Description:

This interdisciplinary course explores several forms of nationalism in Canada, with particular attention to contemporary perspectives. It focuses on both English- and French-speaking regions of Canada and examines how various social and cultural groups, including immigrants and First Nations, have advanced different visions of the nation, national belonging, and national identity. The readings and assignments draw from scholarly publications, political statements and documents, advertising, sport, and music. Through this interdisciplinary approach, students will gain a greater understanding of nationalism as a concept, various cultural groups in Canada, and the production of power and difference through nationalist discourses and sentiments. The course is open to students of all disciplines, and different viewpoints and academic backgrounds are respected and encouraged. As a second-year course, students are expected to have some experience in academic writing and critical analysis.

Purpose and Objectives:

1) The ability to evaluate the characteristics and complexities of nationalism in Canada.

2) The ability to critically examine the interrelationship between ideas of belonging and cultural and political power.

3) The ability to critically analyze a range of primary sources.

4) A greater understanding of how nationalist discourses constitute difference, especially with respect to race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality.

5) The ability to describe many key features of contemporary Canada in written and oral form.

Class Structure:

Classes consist of a lecture, a discussion of readings, and occasional group activities.

Evaluation:

1. Peer response exercise. In class on September 30, 5%

2. Critical analysis of three newspaper articles. Due Monday, October 7, 20%

3. Essay abstract and bibliography. Due Monday, October 21, 10%

4. Essay. Due Monday, November 18, 40%

5. Term test. In class on Wednesday, December 4, 25%

1. Peer response exercise: Students will have to attend class and participate in the peer review exercise in order to receive any marks for this assignment. Students need to bring a complete draft of assignment 2, and provide feedback to two classmates. Several instructors from the UC Writing Centre will join us for one hour to facilitate the peer response process. Revision is an important part of academic writing, and the goal of this exercise is to help students give and receive feedback to peers in order to revise their work. For the assignment, evaluation will be based on attendance and participation as well as on bringing a completed draft of assignment 2 to class.

2. Critical analysis of three newspaper articles. 600-750 words. Students are required to critically analyze and discuss how authors discuss some aspect of nationalism in Canada in three separate newspaper articles. They are asked to compare how three authors present different views of nation through their discussion of a single topic (such as sports, companies, travel, international reputation, economics immigration, Aboriginal peoples, historical memory, etc.). Students are welcome to discuss their ideas with Dr. Bryce during his office hours in the weeks leading up to the due date.

3. Essay abstract and bibliography. 200-250 words and five titles. Students will have to select a topic for their research essay well in advance of the due date. For this short assignment (due October 21), students are asked to submit a 200-250-word overview of the general thrust of their essay and to explain their research question. In addition, they are required to include an annotated bibliography of at least five scholarly articles or books that they will use for their research essay. The five sources cannot be those assigned in class. To annotate the bibliography, students are required to provide a brief description of the article or book and explain how it connects to their research question. Students are welcome to discuss their ideas with Dr. Bryce during his office hours in the weeks leading up to the due date.

4. Essay. 1,700-2,000 words. Students will select a topic that examines some aspect of nationalism in Canada. The essay will combine a discussion of several scholarly sources as well as a minimum of three primary sources (newspaper articles, commercials, garments, images, songs, works of art, etc.) that further illustrate the topic of the essay. Students can draw from lecture topics, course readings, and primary sources discussed in class. However, they need to make use of new material beyond the assigned readings. Students need to cite and discuss a minimum of five scholarly sources not assigned in class (not all sources need to have appeared in the annotated bibliography). This is not an opinion piece but rather an analysis of the scholarly arguments and a critical examination of primary sources. Students are welcome to discuss their ideas with Dr. Bryce during his office hours in the weeks leading up to the due date.

5. Term test. 1:45 hours, in class on Wednesday, December 4. Students will be asked to answer three of five questions in essay form, drawing from lectures and readings. Students will be expected to discuss material from lectures, video clips, songs, and readings. Because we will miss two classes during the semester (October 14 and November 11), the University has allocated Wednesday, December 4 as a make-up class.

Required Readings:

Two copies of the assigned book are on three-hour reserve at the University College library (Laidlaw Library). It is also available for purchase at the U of T bookstore for approximately $30. Links to all journal articles can be found through Blackboard. To download the articles, you will need to be connected to the internet through the University of Toronto’s network, login to my.access with your UTORid via University of Toronto Web Login, or configure a proxy on your web browser (such as the EZProxy add-on for Firefox).

Secondary sources:

Patricia Cormack and James Cosgrave. Desiring Canada: CBC Contests, Hockey Violence and Other Stately Pleasures. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2013.

  • Two copies are on three-hour reserve at the University College library
  • You can purchase a copy at the U of T bookstore for approximately $30.

Jane Nicholas. “Gendering the Jubilee: Gender and Modernity in the Diamond Jubilee of Confederation Celebrations, 1927.” Canadian Historical Review  90 (2009):  247-274.

Donald Cuccioletta and Martin Lubin. “The Quebec Quiet Revolution: A Noisy Evolution.” Quebec Studies 36 (2003): 125-138.

Michael Burgess. “Ethnicity, Nationalism and Identity in Canada-Quebec Relations: The case of Quebec’s ‘Distinct Society’.” Journal of Commonwealth and Comparative Politics 34 (1996): 46-64.

Matthew Hayday. “Fireworks, Folk-dancing, and Fostering a National Identity: The Politics of Canada Day,” Canadian Historical Review 91 (2010): 287-314.

Darryl Leroux. “Quebec Nationalism and the Production of Difference: The Bouchard-Taylor Commission, the Herouxville Code of Conduct, and Quebec’s Immigrant Integration Policy.” Quebec Studies 49 (2010): 107-126.

Kristina Fagan. “Tewatatha:wi: Aboriginal Nationalism in Taiaiake Alfred’s Peace, Power, Righteousness: An Indigenous Manifesto.” The American Indian Quarterly 28 (2004): 12-29.

Primary sources:

Thomas Walkom. “Yes to nationalism on Canada Day, no to jingoism.” Toronto Star. June 28, 2013.

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2013/06/28/yes_to_nationalism_on_canada_day_no_to_jingoism_walkom.html

Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters and Sciences, 1949-1951 (Massey Commission). Chapter 1, “The Nature of the Task,” pp. 3-10.  http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/2/5/h5-400-e.html#content

Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters and Sciences, 1949-1951 (Massey Commission). Chapter 2, “The Forces of Geography,” pp. 11-18.  http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/2/5/h5-400-e.html#content

Rick Salutin. “You Can’t Kill Canadian Nationalism.” Toronto Star. January 26, 2012. http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/2012/01/26/you_cant_kill_canadian_nationalism.html

Neil Bissoondath. “Multiculturalism.” New Internationalism Magazine. Issue 305. http://newint.org/features/1998/09/05/multiculturalism/

Taiaiake Alfred. “Who Are You Calling Canadian?” Aboriginal Multi-Media Society (2000). http://www.ammsa.com/node/23047

CBC, The Sunday Edition with Michael Enright. “Canada: Whose history is it?” http://www.cbc.ca/thesundayedition/features/2013/06/16/the-canadian-government-and-canadian-history/ (listen to the 30-minute broadcast)

Steven Chase and Daniel Leblanc. “War of 1812: ‘Little-known war’ of 1812 a big deal for Ottawa.” Globe and Mail. April 27, 2013. http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/little-known-war-of-1812-a-big-deal-for-ottawa/article11588326/

War of 1812 – The Fight for Canada: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=38BO7GI0vQQ

Rick Salutin. “The mystery of Stephen Harper’s anglophilia.” Toronto Star. September 27, 2012.

“A Timbit Nation?” Winnipeg Free Press. August 15, 2006. http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/historic/31792939.html

Ken Macqueen and Nicholas Köhler. “Olympic secrets revealed.” Macleans. January 12, 2010. http://www2.macleans.ca/2010/01/12/olympic-secrets-revealed/ (all 5 webpages)

Blackboard: This course has a Blackboard site where this syllabus is posted.  Links to the assigned journal articles will be posted there as well. The instructor will frequently post materials to Blackboard, and students should check this site regularly. More detailed descriptions of the assignments will be posted on the Blackboard site at least two weeks before the due date.

Faculty of Arts and Science Definition of Grades

Evaluation of Written Work: Essays will be returned accompanied by comments noting areas that need attention.  A copy of these comments will be retained on file. Essays and assignments will only be returned to the writer. Questions about grades cannot be answered effectively with e-mail. The Faculty of Arts and Science only permits the re-marking of assignments within one month of the date of the assignment’s return to you. Please read carefully the Faculty of Arts and Science Definition of Grades (above) before discussing your grade on an assignment with Dr. Bryce. If you ask him to reconsider an assignment, note that your grade could go either up or down.

E-mail policy: Please use e-mail to communicate with me only for administrative matters. Please come to me during my office hours to address questions that you have or raise them before or after our weekly class. If you cannot make it to my office hours, please talk with me after class or e-mail me to set up an alternative appointment. I will respond to e-mails within 48 hours, so please do not leave your inquiries to the last minute. Please take the time to compose a formal e-mail. Assignments will not be accepted by email. Please use your University of Toronto e-mail address to communicate with me, and please check this e-mail account regularly to receive updates about this course.

Organization: I encourage you to bring a draft of your essays to my office hours the week before they are due, and I would be happy to provide some general commentary on your essay. I cannot read drafts submitted by e-mail. I also suggest that you allow time to proofread your work for grammar, clarity, and content.

UC Writing Centre: Take advantage of the services offered at the UC Writing Centre (located in the UC library) or those found at your own college (http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/writing-centres/arts-and-science). The UC Writing Centre is available for students to discuss assignments in all UC courses, no matter what college students belong to. The Writing Centre provides individual instruction during a 50-minute appointment. Make your appointments, based on assignment deadlines, as soon as possible. The Writing Centre also offers drop-in services. Appointments can be made online: http://www.uc.utoronto.ca/writing-centre.

Canadian Studies program: Those interested in majoring or minoring in Canadian Studies, please come talk to Dr. Bryce during his office hours. The director of the Canadian Studies program is Dr. Emily Gilbert (emily.gilbert@utoronto.ca). The Canadian Studies program’s website is uc.utoronto.ca/canadianstudies

Technology Etiquette in the Classroom: Laptops may be used in class, but please focus on the class lecture and discussion. Do not distract your fellow students by checking e-mail or Facebook or watching videos. Please turn off your cellphones and do not use them in class. Save your texting for later. 

Twitter: Feel free to follow me on Twitter (@BenjaminBryce2). I tweet articles about university affairs, graduate school, Canadian Studies, and history. I will also use the hashtag #cdns267 to tweet articles, images, and songs related to this course topic. All students are welcome to use this hashtag and to tweet articles, images, and songs related to our course content as well. Please remember to compose all tweets using the professional language that is expected in the classroom at the University of Toronto. Using Twitter is not a requirement for this course. No important course content will be distributed over Twitter. The hashtag #cdns267 exists only to share related materials and to create a sense of community.

Submission of written work and lateness penalty: Assignments are due in class. Late submission of an assignment will be penalized by the deduction of five percentage points per day (excluding weekends). If an assignment is not handed in during class, it is considered a day late. Late assignments will not be accepted after one week without a valid medical certificate. Late assignments should be submitted and date-stamped in the University College Program Office located at UC173. Neither the course instructor nor the University College Program Office will be held responsible for any late assignments that go missing. Be sure to retain a copy of your paper and keep all your notes and drafts.

Illness and absences: Please obtain lecture notes from a classmate if you miss one or more classes. The Powerpoint does not contain enough information to get a grasp of the lecture. Notify your course instructor as soon as possible if a serious illness or other concern is affecting your ability to keep up with the course. It is also wise to contact your college registrar if you are experiencing academic or personal difficulties.

Academic Honesty and Plagiarism

The code of academic conduct disallows the following:

  • to represent as one’s own any idea or expression of an idea or work of another in any academic examination or term test or in connection with any other form of academic work, i.e. to commit plagiarism;
  • to submit, without the knowledge and approval of the instructor to whom it is submitted, any academic work for which credit has previously been obtained or is being sought in another course or program of study in the University or elsewhere

The University of Toronto takes academic honesty very seriously.  Any suspected cases of plagiarism will be investigated. “How not to plagiarize” can be read on the University’s writing web site, at http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice/using-sources/how-not-to-plagiarize.

Authors do not cite sources properly merely to avoid accusations of plagiarism but also to establish credibility, bring other work to the reader’s attention, and demonstrate competing viewpoints.

Accessibility and Accommodations: Students with diverse learning styles and needs are welcome in this course. If you have a disability/health consideration that may require course format accommodation, please feel free to approach the course instructor to discuss your needs.  If you require accommodations for a disability, or have accessibility concerns about the course, the classroom or course materials, please contact Accessibility Services as soon as possible: 416-978-8060 or accessibility.services@utoronto.ca

Student Conduct: Students and instructors are expected to maintain a professional relationship characterized by courtesy and mutual respect and to refrain from actions disruptive to such a relationship.  It is the responsibility of the instructor to maintain an appropriate academic atmosphere in the classroom and the responsibility of the student to cooperate in that endeavour. The instructor is the best person to decide, in the first instance, whether such an atmosphere is present in the class.  A statement of the policy and procedures involving disruptive and/or harassing behaviour by students in academic situations is available on the U of T website:

http://www.governingcouncil.utoronto.ca/policies/studentc.htm

Lecture and Reading Overview:

September 9

  • Lecture: Introduction and theoretical overview
  • Readings:
  1. “Nationalism”
  2. “Nation”
  3. “Patriotism”
  4. “National identity”
  5. “Ideology”

September 16

  • Lecture: Competing Canadas from Confederation to the Second World War
  • Readings:
  1. Jane Nicholas. “Gendering the Jubilee: Gender and Modernity in the Diamond Jubilee of Confederation Celebrations, 1927.” Canadian Historical Review  90 (2009):  247-274.
  2. Thomas Walkom. “Yes to nationalism on Canada Day, no to jingoism.” Toronto Star. June 28, 2013.

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2013/06/28/yes_to_nationalism_on_canada_day_no_to_jingoism_walkom.html

  • Last day to add fall courses. September 22.

September 23

  • Lecture: The Quiet Revolution in Quebec
  • Readings:
  1. Donald Cuccioletta and Martin Lubin. “The Quebec Quiet Revolution: A Noisy Evolution.” Quebec Studies 36 (2003): 125-138.
  2. Michael Burgess. “Ethnicity, Nationalism and Identity in Canada-Quebec Relations: The case of Quebec’s ‘Distinct Society’.” Journal of Commonwealth and Comparative Politics 34 (1996): 46-64.

September 30

  • Lecture: The English Canadian Quiet Revolution
  • Readings:
  1. Matthew Hayday. “Fireworks, Folk-dancing, and Fostering a National Identity: The Politics of Canada Day,” Canadian Historical Review 91 (2010): 287-314.
  2. Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters and Sciences, 1949-1951 (Massey Commission). Chapter 1, “The Nature of the Task,” pp. 3-10.  http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/2/5/h5-400-e.html#content
  3. Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters and Sciences, 1949-1951 (Massey Commission). Chapter 2, “The Forces of Geography,” pp. 11-18.  http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/2/5/h5-400-e.html#content
  4. Rick Salutin. “You Can’t Kill Canadian Nationalism.” Toronto Star. January 26, 2012. http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/2012/01/26/you_cant_kill_canadian_nationalism.html

Peer response exercise. In class. 5% of total mark.

October 7

  • Lecture: Multiculturalism
  • Readings:
  1. Darryl Leroux. “Quebec Nationalism and the Production of Difference: The Bouchard-Taylor Commission, the Herouxville Code of Conduct, and Quebec’s Immigrant Integration Policy.” Quebec Studies 49 (2010): 107-126.
  2. Neil Bissoondath. “Multiculturalism.” New Internationalism Magazine. Issue 305. http://newint.org/features/1998/09/05/multiculturalism/

Critical analysis of three newspaper articles due. 20% of total mark.

October 14

  • Thanksgiving. University closed

October 21

  • Lecture: First Nations and the Nation?
  • Readings:
  1. Taiaiake Alfred. “Who Are You Calling Canadian?” Aboriginal Multi-Media Society (2000). http://www.ammsa.com/node/23047
  2. Kristina Fagan. “Tewatatha:wi: Aboriginal Nationalism in Taiaiake Alfred’s Peace, Power, Righteousness: An Indigenous Manifesto.” The American Indian Quarterly 28 (2004): 12-29.

Essay abstract and bibliography due. 10% of total mark.

October 28

  • Lecture: National Symbols
  • Readings:
  1. Desiring Canada, Chapter 1: “Contesting Canada at the CBC,” 17-61

November 4

  • Lecture: Refashioning National History
  • Readings:
  1. CBC, The Sunday Edition with Michael Enright. “Canada: Whose history is it?” http://www.cbc.ca/thesundayedition/features/2013/06/16/the-canadian-government-and-canadian-history/ (listen to the 30-minute broadcast)
  2. Steven Chase and Daniel Leblanc. “War of 1812: ‘Little-known war’ of 1812 a big deal for Ottawa.” Globe and Mail. April 27, 2013. http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/little-known-war-of-1812-a-big-deal-for-ottawa/article11588326/
  3. War of 1812 – The Fight for Canada: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=38BO7GI0vQQ
  4. Rick Salutin. “The mystery of Stephen Harper’s anglophilia.” Toronto Star. September 27, 2012. http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/2012/09/27/the_mystery_of_stephen_harpers_anglophilia.html
  • Deadline to drop fall courses. After November 4, a mark is recorded for each course, whether course work is completed or not (a 0 is assigned for incomplete work), and calculated into the GPA.

November 11

  • University closed for fall break

November 18

  • Lecture: Sport
  • Readings:
  1. Desiring Canada, Chapter 3, “‘Our Game’: Hockey, Civilizing Projects, and Domestic Violence,” 94-134
  2. Ken Macqueen and Nicholas Köhler. “Olympic secrets revealed.” Macleans. January 12, 2010. http://www2.macleans.ca/2010/01/12/olympic-secrets-revealed/ (all 5 webpages)

Essay due. 40% of total mark.

November 25

  • Lecture: Advertising
  • Guest speaker: James Cosgrave, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Trent University. Co-author of Desiring Canada.
  • Readings:
  1. Desiring Canada, Chapter 2, “‘Always Fresh, Always There’: Tim Hortons and the Consumer-Citizen,” 62-93;
  2. “A Timbit Nation?” Winnipeg Free Press. August 15, 2006.

December 2

  • Course summary, review, and test preparation
  • Readings:
  1. Desiring Canada, Chapter 5, “The Funny State Apparatus,” 173-211.

December 4

In-class term test. 25% of total mark.

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